Five Days in Rome – Part 2

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St. John the Baptist by Igor Mitoraj at Santa Maria degli Angeli e dei Martiri / Piazza della Repubblica

 

avant garde Nativity made of what looks like aluminum scraps

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The Ludus Magnus or The Great Gladiatorial Training School is the largest of the gladiatorial arenas in Rome, Italy. It was built by the emperor Domitian (81-96 AD) in the valley between the Esquiline and the Caelian hills, an area already occupied by Republican and Augustan structures. The still visible ruins of the monument belong to a second building stage attributed to the emperor Trajan (98-117). (from Wikipedia)

 

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Basilica di San Clemente

 

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The Colosseum or Coliseum, also known as the Flavian Amphitheatre is an elliptical ampitheatre in the centre of the city of Rome. Built of concrete and stone, it was the largest amphitheatre of the Roman Empire, and is considered one of the greatest works of Roman architecture and engineering. It is the largest amphitheatre in the world. (from Wikipedia)

 

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The temple of Venus as seen from the Square of the Colosseum.

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Arch of Constantine

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The Trevi Fountain is a fountain in the Trevi district in Rome, designed by Italian architect Nicola Salvi and completed by Pietro Bracci. It is the largest Baroque fountain in the city and one of the most famous fountains in the world. The fountain has appeared in several notable films, including Federico Fellini’s La Dolce Vita and is a popular tourist attraction. (from Wikipedia)

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At the Spanish Steps

The Spanish Steps (Scalinata della Trinità dei Monti) are a set of steps, climbing a steep slope between the Piazza di Spagna at the base and Piazza Trinità dei Monti, dominated by the Trinità dei Monti church at the top. The Scalinata is the widest staircase in Europe. (from Wikipedia)

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Column of the Immaculate Conception

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The Pantheon

The Pantheon is a building, commissioned by Marcus Agrippa during the reign of Augustus as a temple to all the gods of ancient Rome, and rebuilt by the emperor Hadrian about 126 AD.

The building is circular with a portico of large granite Corinthian columns (eight in the first rank and two groups of four behind) under a pediment. A rectangular vestibule links the porch to the rotunda, which is under a coffered concrete dome, with a central opening (oculus) to the sky. Almost two thousand years after it was built, the Pantheon’s dome is still the world’s largest unreinforced concrete dome. The height to the oculus and the diameter of the interior circle are the same, 43.3 metres (142 ft).

It is one of the best-preserved of all Roman buildings. It has been in continuous use throughout its history, and since the 7th century, the Pantheon has been used as a Roman Catholic church dedicated to “St. Mary and the Martyrs” but informally known as “Santa Maria Rotonda.” The square in front of the Pantheon is called Piazza della Rotonda. (from Wikipedia)

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Piazza Navona

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Piazza di San Pietro after dark New Year’s Eve.

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Peggy, Lois, Judy in St. Peter’s Square after dinner on New Year’s Eve.

 

Rolo B Castillo © 2014